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All About Diamonds

All you need to know about
diamonds before deciding
which to buy.

Carat Weight


Like many precious products, a diamond's weight and its value are related. The unit of weight for diamonds is the metric carat, which is one-fifth of a gram, and is divided into 100 points.

There is a high degree of precision when weighing diamonds, as they are weighed to a thousandth of a carat rounded to the nearest hundred.

The "Magic" Weight

The Relationship between Carat & Value



Bigger diamonds are usually more valuable than smaller ones – but not always.
The other Cs – colour, clarity and cut – also contribute to the value of a diamond. For example, a 0.70 carat D colour internally flawless (IF) diamond may be more expensive than a 1.02 carat J colour SI2 diamond, due primarily to the rarity of D-IF diamonds.

Certain weights could be considered "magic weights" – such as 0.50, 0.75 and 1.00 carat – because the price of
diamonds at these weight points may vary significantly from those below these points.

For example, a 1.00 carat D VVS1 diamond rated triple excellent in terms of cut, polish and symmetry may cost much more per carat than a 0.98 carat diamond with the same characteristics. This is because the 1.00 carat diamond is at the "magic" 1 carat threshold, and large diamonds are rarer than smaller ones.

How Do I Choose
The Right Carat Weight?



As with everything related to diamonds, the decision to choose the right weight depends on a number of factors:
BUDGET REASON TO
BUY THE DIAMOND
PERSONAL
TASTE
EXPECTATION OF
YOUR LOVED ONE
If you are Investing In Diamonds for the future, consider white round brilliant cuts with sizes between 1 to 3 carats, and colours from D to F.

If your budget is pre-determined, sometimes it makes sense to choose a diamond slightly below the "magic" weight, so that it
comes close to the ideal weight while retaining identical characteristics where the other 3 Cs are concerned. You may also choose a smaller diamond with a larger table, although table sizes larger than 60% come with a trade-off in terms of the brilliance of the diamond.

Carat & Size